Host Feedback for
Andrew Forsthoefel

Forsthoefel’s invitation is simple: Listen. Yet this is a complex and timely challenge in a world saturated with talk. The power of the book for our community lies in its surprise: one might assume a tale about a man spending time outside, in nature, away from social politics. Yet Forsthoefel’s wanderings remind us how intricately the American landscape and the human experience in it compel us to grapple with and confront issues of racism, sexism, homophobia, poverty, and privilege. If we take the steps to listen. (Director of Teaching and Learning)

Holderness School used Walking to Listen for the all-school read in the summer of 2017, then had Andrew Forsthoefel speak to our community, visit classes, and connect with faculty. Simply put, it was as useful and meaningful an all-school read/all-school talk as I’ve seen in over 20 years of being about this life. (Head of School)
— Holderness School, New Hampshire
 
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We chose Walking to Listen as our 2017 all-school read for its authenticity of voice and experience that embody our school’s core values of curiosity, inclusion, integrity, perseverance, resilience, and respect. Beyond Andrew’s search for identity, readers experience the wildly different points of view of people from across our country. In creating space for all perspectives, Andrew conveys the critical importance of hearing one another and how that process can be transformational. Aside from being a skillful writer, Andrew is also a truly magnetic speaker. He visited Berkshire to announce the selection to our school community, and not only did we sell out of copies of his book, he drew a crowd that didn’t disperse for nearly two hours after his talk. Walking to Listen is an incredible story written by a thoughtful, engaging, and generous soul.
— Berkshire School, Massachusetts
Walking to Listen is a perfect compliment to any program that hopes to improve a student’s ability to listen, to be intentional, and to empathize. The book stresses the importance of participation in local and intercultural conversations in order for students to become sophisticated, life-long learners. The theme is interdisciplinary and can be used in a variety of contexts, but perhaps most importantly, it proves that the best educations require learning both inside and outside of the traditional classroom.
— Lipscomb University
 
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Dublin School was thrilled to have Andrew Forsthoefel deliver our 2017 Commencement Address. Trustees, parents, faculty, alumni and students all remarked that it was the most personal, powerful, and meaningful address that they had ever heard. Andrew brought the stories from his wonderful book Walking to Listen to life by connecting his journey to the unique journeys of our students. We look forward to continued conversations with Andrew as we work to bring the lessons of his book to our community. I highly recommend Walking to Listen as a community book and would encourage any school to bring Andrew to their campus to speak with their students!
— Dublin School, New Hampshire
Andrew reminds us of the importance of listening first. During a time when tribalism dominates and we identify those with differing perspectives as “other”, we are reminded to be more thorough in our search for the humanity in each of us. (Coordinator)

I truly enjoyed your presentation, and I am especially grateful to have just finished reading your book. I am currently completing my Masters in Higher Education Administration at UMASS, and this book truly has/will enhance my ability to support students through a time that they are formulating their identities and navigating the complex terrain of what ”adulthood” is in our society. I have already passed your book to another peer in my cohort, as I truly believe higher education professionals should read this brilliant work! As a young adult also trying to explore purpose and discover my authentic and truest self, especially when “adulthood” is such an elusive concept in our society, your presentation was personally comforting. Your presentation, and book, helped me to contemplate the meaning of the human experience and human connection, as well as grapple with the difficulty of not always having an answer. Your focus on mindfulness, gratitude, and empathy, as well as your profound ability for self-reflection, was nothing short of inspirational. By sharing your journey, my journey feels less isolating. Thank you again so much, and I will absolutely recommend to other schools that they host you! (Student Development Administrator)
— Greenfield Community College
 
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Andrew left behind a footprint at our school that we hope has cracked some of our students preconceived notions of the world and its people. He gifted our community with his deep human message about the art of listening and connection that is urgently needed not only for our students but also for the world. Through telling his story, he touches on the core of what it truly means to be a global citizen. Travel does not make you a “global citizen” but rather it is the development of the complex ability to move in and out of human experiences that are profoundly different from your own that makes you a “global citizen”. The students who went on the “walk to listen” with Andrew got to experience this and will never forget it. Their reflections were from the heart and the experience was life changing. (Academic Technology Specialist)

Andrew is a deeply engaging speaker. While some students were inspired by the sheer physical endurance he exhibited walking across America, others were inspired by the deep connections he forged with complete strangers. Others still were drawn in by his kindness and humility. After his talk, we broke into our advisory groups and continued the conversation. My group, like many others, was able to talk about the skill of trustworthy listening, and connect with one another on a deeper level than we had before. I would recommend Andrew to any school, church, or community group. His message is so important right now. (Dean of Community Life)
— Tabor Academy
Andrew Forsthoefel, the author of WALKING TO LISTEN, came to Langley high school in McLean, Virginia for an author’s visit on October 11th, 2018. Andrew spent the day with our students giving two talks to upperclassmen and leading active listening workshops with smaller student groups. He also signed books and talked to many Langley students individually. The student and faculty reaction to the day with Andrew Forsthoefel was amazing. One teacher emailed me and said: “It was wonderful! My 7th period loved being with Andrew for the listening workshop. Wow, wow, wow! I was completely moved by what the kids revealed to him in that session. We are all closer as a class because of it!” This is but one comment that I have heard about how inspiring and uplifting the day was for our entire community. I heartily recommend inviting Andrew Forsthoefel to your school or community. He is tireless in his passion to get the message out that we will have a kinder world if we take the time to truly listen. I cannot thank you enough for the gift that you have given to the Langley community. Today, as I write this, it seems that the entire school is still on this heart-felt high. People are smiling more. The conversations between colleagues are lasting a little longer. Teachers are rethinking their interactions with students. We are all working a little harder to make kindness our goal.
— Langley High School, VA
 
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At a time when the world is short on compassion, long on meanness or anger, and confused about kindness, the role of our school communities is critical. Andrew Forsthoefel understands this viscerally. As an independent school graduate himself, Andrew’s work with our Upper School students was compelling. He encouraged our seniors to be themselves, to discover their call, and not to bend to the pressure of society or social norms. His story is compelling and his sincere way of sharing it inspired our students and faculty.
— Tower Hill School, DE