Photo by Heather Perry

Photo by Heather Perry

Written with sensual, poetic, and evocative prose, this remarkable memoir is an honest and naked exploration of what it means to live as a young woman in the quiet wreckage of a broken home, in a town whose central industry is punishing criminals, in a time in our history when social norms were shifting and no one seemed to be in charge, and it was so very easy to fall perilously between the cracks.  A deeply moving, timely, and important memoir .  ~ Andre Dubus III, author of  Townie  and  Gone So Long

Written with sensual, poetic, and evocative prose, this remarkable memoir is an honest and naked exploration of what it means to live as a young woman in the quiet wreckage of a broken home, in a town whose central industry is punishing criminals, in a time in our history when social norms were shifting and no one seemed to be in charge, and it was so very easy to fall perilously between the cracks. A deeply moving, timely, and important memoir.

~ Andre Dubus III, author of Townie and Gone So Long

Maureen Stanton

Maureen Stanton is the author of Body Leaping Backward: Memoir of a Delinquent Girlhood (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2019), and Killer Stuff and Tons of Money: An Insider’s Look at the World of Flea Markets, Antiques, and Collecting (Penguin 2012), winner of a Massachusetts Book Award in nonfiction. Her nonfiction has been widely published in literary journals and anthologies, including in Fourth Genre, Creative Nonfiction, New England Review, Florida Review, River Teeth, Sport Literate, Crab Orchard Review, The Sun and many others.

She’s received an Iowa Review prize, Pushcart Prizes, the American Literary Review nonfiction award, the Thomas J. Hruska award in nonfiction from Passages North, the Penelope Niven Nonfiction Award from Salem College Center for Women Writers, a Mary Roberts Rinehart Award, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, Maine Arts Commission, the MacDowell Colony, and the Virginia Center for Creative Arts. She teaches creative writing at the University of Massachusetts Lowell.

A blazingly important memoir about the possibility of change.
— People Magazine
Forget the cult of the bad boy, Maureen Stanton’s BODYLEAPING BACKWARD makes my skin shiver and my heart pound out a hell yes. Set in the 70s and the coming wave of drugs, a family falls to pieces. The mother descends into delinquency and soon Maureen follows—but this story reminds us how mothers and daughters clawing their way back to life is an epic journey of courage and guts and heart. A triumph.
— Lidia Yuknavitch, author of THE MISFIT'S MANIFESTO